SR22 Insurance is a vehicle liability document required by the Department of Motor Vehicles for “high-risk” drivers. It is a document issued by your insurance company showing proof that you are carrying the minimum amount of auto insurance required in your state. An SR22 filing is issued by your insurance company to serve as a guarantee to the Department of Motor Vehicles that you have secured the minimum liability coverage required by state law. The first thing you need to do is contact your car insurance company. In most states there is a $15 to $25 fee to file the SR22.


The insurance policy is generally an integrated contract, meaning that it includes all forms associated with the agreement between the insured and insurer.[2]:10 In some cases, however, supplementary writings such as letters sent after the final agreement can make the insurance policy a non-integrated contract.[2]:11 One insurance textbook states that generally "courts consider all prior negotiations or agreements ... every contractual term in the policy at the time of delivery, as well as those written afterward as policy riders and endorsements ... with both parties' consent, are part of the written policy".[3] The textbook also states that the policy must refer to all papers which are part of the policy.[3] Oral agreements are subject to the parol evidence rule, and may not be considered part of the policy if the contract appears to be whole. Advertising materials and circulars are typically not part of a policy.[3] Oral contracts pending the issuance of a written policy can occur.[3]
Insurance contracts are generally considered contracts of adhesion because the insurer draws up the contract and the insured has little or no ability to make material changes to it. This is interpreted to mean that the insurer bears the burden if there is any ambiguity in any terms of the contract. Insurance policies are sold without the policyholder even seeing a copy of the contract.[2]:27 In 1970 Robert Keeton suggested that many courts were actually applying 'reasonable expectations' rather than interpreting ambiguities, which he called the 'reasonable expectations doctrine'. This doctrine has been controversial, with some courts adopting it and others explicitly rejecting it.[5] In several jurisdictions, including California, Wyoming, and Pennsylvania, the insured is bound by clear and conspicuous terms in the contract even if the evidence suggests that the insured did not read or understand them.[6][7][8]
The idea for Allstate Insurance Company came during a bridge game on a commuter train in 1930, when insurance broker Carl L. Odell proposed to Wood, his neighbor, the idea of selling auto insurance by direct mail. The idea appealed to Wood, and he passed the proposal to the Sears board of directors, which approved it. Allstate Insurance Company, named after Sears’ tire brand, went into business on April 17, 1931, offering auto insurance by direct mail and through the Sears catalog.[9] This was in line with one of the objectives of a company to sell automobile insurance in the same manner as Sears sold its merchandise.[10]
×