Collision and comprehensive insurance are two optional types of auto insurance where your insurer pays for repairs to your vehicle. While there are other optional auto insurance coverages, liability, comprehensive, and collision are three of the most common. These coverages work hand-in-hand to repair or replace most of the damages to your car. It's important to know the difference, and make sure you're adequately covered.
Your cover will of course depend on which company you go with and what types of vehicle you need to insure, but it is much like an annual policy and will be available for cars, vans and possibly motorhomes. These temporary policies are typically fully comprehensive cover, which means that you are insured for any damage caused to the car you are driving. This also means that if you do have an accident and make a claim, whoever owns the car won’t lose their no claims discount.
In fact, even if you are involved in a collision and are not at fault, driving without car insurance of some sort means driving illegally. So more than likely you would not get compensated for your own expenses, even if the other driver was at fault. Avoid tickets, points against your driver’s license, and possible hefty fines by getting at least 24 hour auto insurance coverage for occasional use.
To get the most value out of your car insurance, make sure you’re only paying for the time you need to drive. It’s unlikely you’ll be driving for more than a few hours in a day. If this is true for you, it might be worth buying an hourly car insurance policy. If you’re only going to be driving a car for a couple of hours, it could help you save money. 
Collision insurance is a coverage that helps pay to repair or replace your car if it's damaged in an accident with another vehicle or object, such as a fence or a tree. If you're leasing or financing your car, collision coverage is typically required by the lender. If your car is paid off, collision is an optional coverage on your car insurance policy.
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